Famous steroid related deaths

In January 2004, Major League Baseball announced a new drug policy which originally included random, offseason testing and 10-day suspensions for first-time offenders, 30-days for second-time offenders, 60-days for third-time offenders, and one year for fourth-time offenders, all without pay, in an effort to curtail performance-enhancing drug use (PED) in professional baseball. This policy strengthened baseball's pre-existing ban on controlled substances , including steroids, which has been in effect since 1991. [1] The policy was to be reviewed in 2008, but under pressure from the . Congress , on November 15, 2005, players and owners agreed to tougher penalties; a 50-game suspension for a first offense, a 100-game suspension for a second, and a lifetime ban for a third.

Then, looking to cash in, Canseco brought the entire baseball universe to its knees. He ratted everyone out and people called him a liar. Love him or hate him, Jose was the realest of them all. Everybody from the fans to the commissioner were guilty. The higher-ups allowed the steroid culture to exist for that green piece of paper and they'll be lying if they said different. Case in point: Major League Baseball began testing for steroids for the first time in 2003 under guidelines in which the results were to remain anonymous with no penalties imposed. What type of soft shit is that? If none of these players on this list are allowed in Cooperstown , neither should any of the managers or the execs that were associated with them, especially Bud Selig .

Famous steroid related deaths

famous steroid related deaths


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