Corticosteroids nursing

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus production, and mucosal edema resulting in reversible airflow obstruction. Allergens, air pollutants, cold weather, physical exertion, strong odors, and medications are common predisposing factors for asthma . When an individual is exposed to a trigger, an immediate inflammatory response with bronchospasm happens. This inflammatory process leads to recurrent episodes of asthmatic symptoms such as cough, dyspnea, wheezing, and increased mucus production.

Fibrotic remodeling is responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality associated with ILD. Remodeling of distal airspaces results in hypoxemia . Persistent hypoxemia results in pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling, leading to cor pulmonale . The increased work of breathing associated with reduced compliance results in increased energy expenditure, which, combined with the effects of inflammatory mediators, can result in cachexia . Portions of the lung may be replaced by fibrotic septae between dilated airspaces, the so-called honeycomb changes of endstage interstitial disease. Although the events described above are necessary for repair of the injured lung, excessive activation or failure of resolution of any of these pathways can result in disabling fibrosis.

30 mg/kg/dose (Max: 1 gram/dose) IV or IM once daily for 1 to 3 days. High-dose pulse steroids may be considered as an alternative to a second infusion of IVIG or for retreatment of patients who have had recurrent or recrudescent fever after additional IVIG, but should not be used as routine primary therapy with IVIG in patients with Kawasaki disease. Corticosteroid treatment has been shown to shorten the duration of fever in patients with IVIG-refractory Kawasaki disease or patients at high risk for IVIG-refractory disease. A reduction in the frequency and severity of coronary artery lesions has also been reported with pulse dose methylprednisolone treatment.

Nursing care for the patient with ulcerative colitis includes keeping the patient hydrated, and comfortable. It is important for the nurse to attend to the patient’s level of coping, since nervousness can cause flare ups of symptoms. Engage the patient in open ended conversation and attempt to explore how the patient sees them. Try to understand what the patient is going through and let the patient know that you care and are there for whatever needs that they may have. Help to educate the patient on nutrition and how to handle the stress in their life. Restricting the physical activity of the individual will also help in healing the bowel. This may be hard for the patient who is still youthful and engages in much physical activity and sports. The entire person must be treated. When making a nursing care plan the nurse must take into consideration what the needs of the person are as a whole.

Corticosteroids nursing

corticosteroids nursing

Nursing care for the patient with ulcerative colitis includes keeping the patient hydrated, and comfortable. It is important for the nurse to attend to the patient’s level of coping, since nervousness can cause flare ups of symptoms. Engage the patient in open ended conversation and attempt to explore how the patient sees them. Try to understand what the patient is going through and let the patient know that you care and are there for whatever needs that they may have. Help to educate the patient on nutrition and how to handle the stress in their life. Restricting the physical activity of the individual will also help in healing the bowel. This may be hard for the patient who is still youthful and engages in much physical activity and sports. The entire person must be treated. When making a nursing care plan the nurse must take into consideration what the needs of the person are as a whole.

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